No Starch Press


eBook


94%
59.0% 37.0% 4.0%

Access for free


Check price

Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good

Hey there! This is Learn You Some Erlang for great good! This book is for you if you’ve got some programming experience and if you’re not too familiar with functional programming. It can still be useful if you’re too good for that, as we progressively go into more and more advanced topics.


Reviews

OvermindDL1 @OvermindDL1
As for a tutorial, the best for beginners that I can recommend would be Learn You Some Erlang (For Great Good!), also has a book that is awesome to get, but fully available online too. It would be very easy to elixirify the syntax, hmm...

positive

Wiebe-Marten Wijnja @Qqwy
The best source for more information about these built-in tools in OTP is probably the Learn You Some Erlang for Greater Good book which can be read for free online, and the Elixir in Action book, which is a very nice and comprehensive guide, specific to Elixir (but cannot be read for free).

positive

Marciol @marciol
I'm now reading Programming Phoenix and Learn You Some Erlang for the Great Good, and after that Elixir in Action and Designing for Scalability with Erlang/OTP (O’Reilly), so I think that start Programming Phoenix would be a good choose.

positive

alamba78 @alamba78
Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good (heard great things)

positive

@peerreynders
Looks like I'll have to open an account with No Starch Press if I still want that off-line, portable version of Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good! (hmmm - they've been doing 50% off Day against DRM sales in the past years - we'll see July 9).

positive

Aston @AstonJ
Luckily, there’s a new weapon in the battle against Erlang-phobia: Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good!

positive

@peerreynders
I hate to say it - but at this point I'd recommend Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good! first anyway (not because it's free online - but I guess that helps) and look at these endorsements:

positive

Aston @AstonJ
Fred Hebert is the author of Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good!, a free online (also paid for, on paper) book designed to teach Erlang.

positive

Samuel Volin @untra
I recall while reading Learn you some Erlang for great good that the general vibe of putting together a release was "this is exceptionally complex and you should only do this if you really really need the hotloading capabilities". I think this picture summed it up nicely.

positive

Onorio Catenacci @Onor.io
I know of this chapter from Learn You Some Erlang For Great Good! but I was wondering if there are other resources on

positive

@peerreynders
I just picked up Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good! and The Rust Programming Language.

positive

Benjamin Tan Wei Hao @bentanweihao
Turns out, it is packed with really good content, and it's a book I refer to pretty often, along with LYSE.

positive

Robert Virding @rvirding
LYSE is a really good book, at any price.

positive

Robert Virding @rvirding
A good book is of course Learn You Some Erlang which has chapters on Applications and Releases.

positive

@opsimath
And then I saw that Philip Wadler and Simon Marlow has worked on bringing types to Erlang awhile back but didn't get too far, that and slow compute performance kind of put me off of the idea. http://learnyousomeerlang.com/types-or-lack-thereof and http://homepages.inf.ed.ac.uk/wadler/papers/erlang/erlang.pdf.

positive

Aston @AstonJ
Or read for free online: http://learnyousomeerlang.com

positive

Dina @soundstruck
With a little learnyousomeerlang, elixirsips and Phoenix Trello, blog posts/articles sprinkled in of course.

neutral

svsdehh @svsdehh
I am already working through LYSE.

neutral

Boris Gnezdilov @sysashi
Programming Elixir, after that Learn You Some Erlang.

neutral

Stefan Houtzager @StefanHoutzager
Found this article: http://learnyousomeerlang.com/types-or-lack-thereof

neutral

Paul Schoenfelder @bitwalker
The vibe you're recalling from LYSE if I recall correctly has more to do with appups/hot upgrades - they should be generally avoided unless you really need the functionality and are prepared to deal with the complexity.

neutral

Michal Kunikowski @mkunikow
I am also reading http://haskellbook.com/ plus http://learnyouahaskell.com/ . There is also Erlang book http://learnyousomeerlang.com/.

neutral

Michel Perez @mrkaspa
Check this chapter http://learnyousomeerlang.com/modules#compiling-the-code

neutral

Norbert Melzer @NobbZ
You could give LYSE a read.

neutral

@peerreynders
Learn You Some Erlang: List Comprehensions uses "in" - and it does set up the association between ∈ and <- though it isn't explicit about.

neutral

@peerreynders
http://learnyousomeerlang.com/content

neutral

Juan @sotojuan
I actually "started" by reading Learn You Some Erlang but stopped at the middle of the book for some reason.

negative